Pride Month Email Template: 5+ Awesome Example

To openly include all of the people of our families and communities who previously had to hide who they were, we observe Pride Month. Family discussions about Pride month may have a significant impact on how our kids perceive the world.

Attending a parade, working on a project related to the LGBTQIA+ community, flying a pride flag, giving your family’s time to an LGBTQIA+-related cause, and any other way your family sees fit are all common ways to celebrate!

While raising awareness during the month of June is crucial, we also want to ensure that we continue to live by this message throughout the rest of the year.

Pride Month Email Sample: 1

Dear [mention the name of the recipient]

Every year, June presents a significant chance to celebrate the tenacity of the diverse intersections within our LGBTQ family.

Through Pride, we honor our freedom to love whom we love and to be our most genuine selves. We also celebrate Immigrant Heritage Month, a nationwide initiative that uses the power of narrative to heal rifts among communities. We acknowledge the pride in one’s handicap and oppose systematic ableism and conceptions of disability that is dehumanizing. We also observe Juneteenth, which honors the abolition of slavery in this nation.

These events provide chances to celebrate the achievements and contributions made by the many distinct populations that make Philadelphia the vibrant city it is.

Although it has been fifty years since the tragic demonstrations that took place at the Stonewall Inn over several steamy summer evenings, we in the LGBTQ community are aware that the struggle predated that day and continues to this day. The parallels between the summer of 1951 and the current protests taking place all around the world are now abundantly clear.

Regards,

[Mention the name or company of the sender]

[Mention the signature or logo of the sender, if any]

Pride Month Email Sample

Pride Month Email Sample: 2

Dear [mention the name of the recipient]

Although it has been fifty years since the tragic demonstrations that took place at the Stonewall Inn over several steamy summer evenings, we in the LGBTQ community are aware that the struggle predated that day and continues to this day. The parallels between the summer of 1951 and the current protests taking place all around the world are now abundantly clear.

We reaffirm categorically that Black Lives Matter now. Every day, not only in instances of injustice. We recognize that the Black Lives Matter movement and racial justice protests taking place in Philadelphia and across the nation represent the intricately intertwined struggles of many marginalized identities, including queer and trans people of color, Black people of color, and Indigenous people of color.

LGBTQ Philadelphians have long considered protest and action to be fundamental components of who they are. We persevered through years of revolution, evolution, difficulties, and successes, and now we must rise to the task once more. Because of who they are as a trans person, a person of color, an immigrant, a person with a disability, or any intersection of those identities—too many people today have painful memories of discrimination.

These experiences of historical and systematic oppression have become more prominent while also suffering the sorrow and difficulty of communal mourning and loss in the face of ongoing racial injustice and a worldwide epidemic.

Our community has survived other crises before, including the early AIDS epidemic’s widespread indifference, the ongoing violence against our trans siblings of color, and, yes, the brutality committed by law enforcement against members of our community.

Regards,

[Mention the name or company of the sender]

[Mention the signature or logo of the sender, if any]

Pride Month Email Sample

Pride Month Email Sample: 3

Dear [mention the name of the recipient]

We owe our present to the battles that our elders and ancestors fought before us, and now it is up to us to guarantee that our LGBTQ family has a future by working together to forge a way ahead. Alongside those of us in our community who are most marginalized, we must fight this struggle. Through Pride, we continue the tradition of our ancestors, and this year, we add another crucial thread to the inclusive rainbow of the More Color More Pride banner.

There isn’t just one ideal way to observe Pride. It’s acceptable to feel conflicted or a bit confused while celebrating all the time. For instance, you may rejoice that the Supreme Court upheld Title VII’s protection of LGBTQ+ individuals from discrimination while still feeling angry—or sad—or lost—or any other legitimate emotion—over the decision to rescind healthcare protections for members of the transgender community. While honoring Marsha P. Johnson and other Black trans women who played key roles in the Stonewall riots, you may also recognize and combat the systematic injustices that Black trans women still face today. These things can all happen during a period of pride.

More than ever this year, we celebrate Pride as a form of resistance. This year, despite continued hardship and difficulties, we can forge a sense of community, share our combined experiences, innovate, adapt, and evolve as a group.

This year, we pay tribute to and elevate the voices of those in our community who continue to face the greatest marginalization, including transgender and non-binary people, people of color, immigrants, persons with disabilities, the elderly, children, and those who straddle several identities.

Regards,

[Mention the name or company of the sender]

[Mention the signature or logo of the sender, if any]

Pride Month Email Sample

Pride Month Email Sample: 4

Dear [mention the name of the recipient]

In June, which is Pride Month, we honor LGBTQ+ individuals and their identities and contributions to society. There are several ways to celebrate, express yourself, and care for yourself, even though Pride is frequently seen as a time for, well, pride. If your Pride differs from someone else’s, that’s acceptable.

It is crucial to look after oneself during Pride Month because there is so much going on—so much happiness, so much history, and, regrettably, so much suffering. Your mental health matters, and you are valuable and significant.

It’s acceptable if you can’t go to parades, whether it’s because of safety or health issues or even just because you don’t like parades. You can still have pride. There are alternative ways to celebrate, support LGBTQ+ persons and the cause, and express your identity.

Regardless of the reason, it’s OK to be out to some individuals in your life but not others. You can still have pride. Even if you can’t be who you truly are with some of the people in your life, you are still a real person with a meaningful identity.

Whatever the reason, it’s acceptable if you don’t come out to anyone. You may still be really proud of who you are. You can still have pride. You are welcome to celebrate who you are as suits you. Even if you can’t completely express who you are to the people around you, you still have a genuine identity.

Regards,

[Mention the name or company of the sender]

[Mention the signature or logo of the sender, if any]

Pride Month Email Sample

Pride Month Email Sample: 5

Dear [mention the name of the recipient]

If you’re an ally, be aware that various people may desire different types of support at all times, not just during Pride. Even though they may share similar identities, individual people have diverse requirements. Take care of your own mental health, and make sure you respect your LGBTQ+ friends’ individual limits.

Above all, remember the need to monitor your mental well-being regularly. To be able to share your limits with others, be aware of your own. Don’t let someone else’s celebration of Pride compel you to do the same. Even if others love that way of celebrating, don’t do it if it makes you uncomfortable. Don’t compromise your own demands or limits to celebrate in a well-liked style. Pride may be observed in so many different ways. You should be appreciated and recognized for who you are, but not at the price of your emotional well-being.

There are many different methods to celebrate everyone’s legitimate identities during Pride Month, as well as a wide range of feelings. Take care of yourself while you enjoy yourself and your loved ones. Even if your Pride doesn’t resemble anyone else’s, you can still have a fantastic Pride Month filled with pride.

As we adjusted to the effects of the global COVID-19 epidemic, we realized that this year’s Pride events would differ from what many in our community had expected over the course of many years.

Celebrate with the Office of LGBT Affairs during [mention the name]. Our community’s adage, “We’ve come so far, yet we realize there is much yet to accomplish,” comes to mind. We reaffirm our commitment to constructing a more just future for all of us now.

Regards,

[Mention the name or company of the sender]

[Mention the signature or logo of the sender, if any]

Pride Month Email Sample

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